128 items found for "audio-accessible"

  • Play Test: Death’s Door

    by John Rogers Death is a serious business for the reaper crows of Death’s Door. When a fledgling reaper loses its allotted soul, it leads to a very bird day at the office. Death’s Door is a charming isometric adventure that begins when our protagonist – a delightfully animated sword-wielding crow – arrives to work one morning at the stuffy, grey offices of the Bureau of Death. But this day proves to be anything but normal when a humdrum spirit-reaping field mission goes awry. At the garden of spirits, your allotted soul is whisked away by a mysterious thief. Back at the office, you’re ridiculed for this professional faux-pas, and tasked with tracking the stolen soul down. The trail leads to a mysterious sealed-off realm, where giant beings evade the inevitable through nefarious means, and an intriguing adventure begins. Related: The quest for the seven crystals of... whatever This engaging premise kicks off a story that’s packed with fun dialogue, exploration, hack ‘n’ slash combat, and plenty of puzzles and secrets. You’ll pass through a series of evocative environments, from the creepy stillness of the Ceramic Manor, to the colourful painted walkways of the Sunken Fortress, to a cheery forest village, and the chilly halls of the bureau itself. They’re all painstakingly rendered in a clean and uncluttered visual style, but nevertheless packed with the kind of details that give a tangible and grounded sense of place. Traversing this strange limbo entails regular battles. The game’s combat is solid, if unremarkable; a simplistic take on the strike-and-dodge wave-based fights of Hyper Light Drifter. There are several interesting weapons that feel too similar to weild, and the hard-earned power-ups are incremental stat buffs that do little to add variety. The game is generally polished, but has other issues, stemming largely from design choices. There are some unwelcome difficulty spikes, including two frustrating late-game bosses that sour the experience towards its finale. Sometimes, the isometric perspective can fool the eye, and you’ll find yourself jumping for a platform that turns out to be in the background. Most pressingly, the game is crying out for a map. It’s a mind-boggling omission that leads to lots of schlepping around mazey dungeons looking for the way forward. In the lengthy post-game, finding secrets could have been a real pleasure – but without the aid of a map for more focussed play, it amounts to a tedious retread of each area. These flaws are unfortunate, but they don’t sink the game. The lovely visuals, symphonic score, and engaging story carry the game along nicely. You’ll uncover how this world ended up in such dire straits, and meet some delightful characters. An amateur explorer called Barb The Bard will comically serenade you whenever you cross paths. You’ll be fed by a chef called Jefferson – a giant squid cosplaying as a human, for some reason. And then there’s the unfortunate Pothead, whose head has been turned into a pot of soup by the spooky Urn Witch, aka “Grandma”. This wonderful ensemble cast evokes the surreal fairytale melancholia of grand adventures such as Alice in Wonderland and Spirited Away. Death’s Door is a lovely little game that’s more than the sum of its parts, somehow. With a couple of design tweaks it could have entered the pantheon of indie greats, but it’s still an easy game to recommend, warts and all. I loved my time in this still, gloomy world – and like many of the game’s oddball characters, I wasn’t ready to let go when the end did arrive. VERDICT Good: The visuals are crisp, atmospheric and uncluttered, and the art style is enticing. The orchestral music is fantastic throughout, from sad refrains to wistful shanties, and battle music that gets the pulse racing. There’s a sense of pleasingly logical progression as you move through each area. The setting, dialogue, and cast of memorable characters carry the story along. Bad: The strike-and-dash combat is a little basic, with barely perceptible stat boosts and similar-feeling weapons that feel like a missed opportunity. Where’s the map? This game desperately needs one. A jarring oversight. The restart points are patchy, leading to some repetitive hikes back to the tougher mini-bosses and arena battles. A handful of difficulty spikes feels out of tune with the main thrust of the game. Final score: 7.5/10 Death’s Door is an accomplished, high-quality game that’s loaded with enough heart and charm to overcome a couple of unfortunate flaws. A firm recommendation. John Rogers is an Iceland-based journalist. He is the Social Media Lead for dot big bang, Gaming Editor of the Radical Art Review and the host of Gaming In The Wild

  • A BLOOD CONDITION | In Conversation With Poet Kayo Chingonyi

    by Jessie Jones Our Literature Editor Jessie Jones spoke to Kayo Chingonyi about his new poetry collection A Blood Condition. Kayo has also published his debut collection Kumukanda, which won the Dylan Thomas Prize and a Somerset Maugham Award. He is the author of two pamphlets Some Bright Elegance and The Colour of James Brown’s Scream. He was the poetry editor for The White Review, is a fellow of the Complete Works programme and is an assistance professor of Creative Writing at Durham University. You can buy his debut collection, and A Blood Condition here and visit his website for updates on his other passion project which is writing about the poetics of grime. Along with a reading of some of the wonderful poems from A Blood Condition, Jessie and Kayo discuss his impressive list of accolades, what poetry has meant, and how it has changed, during the global pandemic, and where art and literature can go from here. Founded in 2017, the Radical Art Review is a volunteer-run culture platform and magazine where art meets activism. We believe creativity is the most powerful tool for social change, and we aim to showcase how art and ideas are being used to transform lives and tackle injustices. ​ We are reader-funded and publish digital content every weekday, two monthly newsletters, and biannual print issues.

  • Love is the Message #3: Counterculture Part Two

    by Matt Huxley In the second of two episodes on Counterculture, Tim and Jeremy leave the '60s and move through the rest of the 20th Century, identifying the countercultural characteristics of reggae, punk, hip hop, house, techno and drum & bass. They cover the anti-imperial and anti-colonial sentiment of Rastafarianism, the simultaneous emergence of DJing in both Kingston and New York, and discuss the ambivalent political status of Punk. We also dig into the historiography of House and Techno, and consider the idea and potentiality of 'the machine' for the creators of these musics, asking: can the embrace of pleasure alone ever change the world? Join us next week as we go back to Valentine’s Day 1970 and the very first Loft party. LISTEN BELOW: Produced and edited by Matt Huxley Become a supporter by visiting our Patreon Tracklist: Jonny Osborne - Truth and Rights Patty Smith - Free Money Talking Heads - Remain In Light The Clash - (White Man) in Hammersmith Palais Marshall Jefferson - Move Your Body Rhythim is Rhythim - It Is What It Is A Tribe Called Quest - I Left My Wallet In El Segundo Roni Size - Brown Paper Bag

  • Love is the Message #2: Counterculture Part One

    by Matt Huxley In the first of two episodes on Counterculture, Tim and Jeremy focus on the late ’60s and early ’70s – a period of exceptional cultural and political activity in the UK and the USA. They discuss the emergent New Social Movements, how Rock was institutionalised as the sound of the counterculture at the expense of other genres, the limitations of Timothy Leary’s invitation to ‘tune in and drop out’, the under-appreciated importance of Miles Davis and Jazz to the moment, and whether love really is all you need. Join us next episode for part 2, where we’ll look at countercultural tendencies in Reggae, Hip Hop, Punk, House and Techno. LISTEN BELOW: Produced and edited by Matt Huxley Become a supporter by visiting our Patreon Tracklist: Jimi Hendrix - Purple Haze (live) The Youngbloods - Get Together The Grateful Dead - Birdsong (live) Miles Davis - Bitches Brew Gil Scott-Heron - The Revolution Will Not Be Televised

  • Love is the Message #4: The First Loft

    by Matt Huxley This week Tim and Jeremy take us back to Valentine's Day 1970 for the very first of what would become a 50 year era of David Mancuso's Loft parties. They consider David's childhood experience of collectivised living while in care; the important antecedents found in the rent party scene and the '60s psychedelic culture of the melting pot city of New York; Tim recounts the origins of David's interest in audiophile sound; and the pair ask whether creating a space of freedom on the dance floor can be seen as a form of molecular politics. Join us next week when Tim and Jeremy talk about meeting David, working with him to throw the first UK Loft parties, and forming their own party collective, Lucky Cloud Sound System. LISTEN BELOW: Produced and edited by Matt Huxley Become a supporter by visiting our Patreon Tracklist: Booker T and the MGs - Melting Pot Alice Coltrane - Journey In Satchidananda Dorothy Morrison - Rain War - City, Country, City The Equals - Black Skinned Blue Eyed Boys Manu Dibango - Soul Makosa

  • Pixel Sounds: 11 Essential Video Game Soundtracks

    by John Rogers, Jeremy Miller & Ruth Coppens Video games are perhaps the most intrinsically multidisciplinary of the artistic media. When immersed in playing, it’s easy to forget the amount of work and talent that goes into crafting each game’s interactivity, visual design, foley art, motion-captured physical performance, voice acting, and – of course – music. Much like video game development itself, the production of soundtracks can vary in scope from home-recorded solo projects, right through to grand productions played by world-renowned orchestras. As you’ll see in the list below, much of the more experimental work is to be found on the independently produced side of things, but there are also some AAA productions included in our list. One thing is certain – video game composition is a thriving biome of music that shouldn’t be overlooked. Hyper Light Drifter | Bandcamp | Spotify This pixel art action-adventure is lovingly crafted in all respects, from the expressive sprites to the crackling campfires, colourful wastelands, and mesmerising mountaintops. Award-winning composer Disasterpeace’s soundtrack is absolutely key in creating the emotional core of the game. Fans of Fez will recognise his signature sound, in which distinctive synths are bitcrushed like they’ve journeyed through a dial-up modem before arriving in the game. These pieces are interspersed with quietly mournful piano and guitar melodies, with brighter moments arriving like pixelated sunlight through a forest canopy. One to remember. JR Related: Hidden gems: seven great games you might have missed Final Fantasy | Apple Music Music from several Final Fantasy games – more specifically those composed by Nobuo Uematsu – are songs that deserve a frequent relisten. Over the years, these soundtracks have presented a wide array of emotion and intensity in a variety of musical genres. There have even been touring shows of orchestral performances of these soundtracks, such as “Distant Worlds: The Music of Final Fantasy”. At these events, local orchestras perform the music during multimedia presentations, sometimes accompanied by Nobuo-san himself. The orchestral renditions are a mainstay of the series, but the MIDI and chiptune originals are very much worth a listen. JM Sayonara Wild Hearts | Spotify This neon dream of Nordic design describes itself as an interactive pop album, and justifiably so. Composed by Jonathan Olsén, Daniel Eng and vocalist Linnea Olsson, it’s a sugar-rush of dreamy dance-pop that’ll summon the endorphins as you navigate the barrage of high-speed on-screen action. From the magical reworking of ‘Claire De Lune’ that welcomes you into the game to the anthemic, emotional finale of ‘Wild Hearts Never Die’, this is an unprecedented pairing of contemporary Scandi-pop and thrilling gameplay. JR The Unfinished Swan | YouTube Somewhere between electronic composition and symphonic scope lies Joel Corelitz’s wondrous and surprising soundtrack for The Unfinished Swan. There are grand, chiming melodies, like the lutes and lyres of a fairytale monarch’s court, with eddies of strings swirling around them; washes of electronic sound add softness and ambience. The eponymous opener is intriguing, and it’s built upon throughout the game, as fresh environments and new mechanics are each welcomed with surprising new sounds. JR Hollow Knight | Bandcamp | Spotify This fascinating Metroidvania was an indie smash-hit. It’s an engrossing journey into the depths of a devastated insect kingdom called The Hallownest, and as you creep ever deeper into its dark and dangerous confines, Christopher Larkin’s striking orchestral soundtrack accompanies you into the darkness. It’s that certain kind of adaptive video game music in which every track has several phases, from, say, a quiet cello line to a propulsive, symphonic crescendo, based on the on-screen action. It’s a masterclass – this is how it’s done. JR Mutazione | Bandcamp | Spotify Mutazione is a wonderful narrative adventure game that drips with atmosphere. Set on a steamy tropical island overrun by extranatural plants and populated by a diverse community of friendly mutants, the sounds of the game are drenched with summer sun heat. With a mixture of languid surf sounds, lazy psych jams, lo-fi garage rock, atmospheric guitar sketches, and late-night dream-pop, it’s an indie fan’s dream. JR Signs of the Sojourner | Bandcamp | Spotify This striking game is set in a near-future climate-stricken wasteland, but it’s very far from the post-apocalyptic cliché we’ve become accustomed to. The denizens of the desert spend their time farming, foraging, hustling, making art, and clinging on to the precarious remnants of civilisation. As you traverse the colourful landscape, you’re serenaded by the wonderful music of Skewsound and Steve Pardo. The melancholy finger-picked strings, lively uptempo market-town rhythms, and muted woodwinds provide a lingering desert ambiance that’s mournful, joyful, and wondrous. It’s an intelligent, atmospheric, and prescient game that’s brought to life by the music. JR Kingdom Hearts | Apple Music The Kingdom Hearts series is packed with recognisable and iconic tracks by Yoko Shimomura. They evoke a sense of nostalgia while still feeling fresh. Each character has their own theme, which ties a welcome sense of emotion to each song. A highlight is Roxas, who has a reworked version of ‘The Other Promise’ during his boss battle. It’s a sombre track that makes you feel for the character, in stark contrast to the optimistic, adventurous theme of Sora, our main character. Aside from the character themes, there are also some amazing battle tracks that make you feel like you can take on the world. Memorable ones include ‘The 13th Struggle’, which you’ll encounter a lot. But the staple of Kingdom Hearts’ battle music is ‘Destati’, the very first boss fight song in the original game, which will always be synonymous with the epic music of Kingdom Hearts. It’s impossible to talk about the music of Kingdom Hearts without mentioning ‘Dearly Beloved’. When you boot up a Kingdom Hearts game, it’s the menu song that greets you. Each game has a different iteration of this song, and each version is somehow better than the last. It’s a song that makes me feel like I’m coming home. RC Kentucky Route Zero | Bandcamp | Spotify As much a multidisciplinary artwork as a video game, Kentucky Route Zero excels in all departments, including the soundtrack. The blissful electronic washes by Ben Babbitt are accentuated by occasional folk interludes by The Bedquilt Ramblers, who appear in silhouette at pivotal moments in the game. There are also several in-game concerts, the most memorable of which is a performance by Junebug & Johnny – two android musicians who perform a jaw-dropping number entitled “Too Late To Love You”, in which the player can choose the lyrics. JR FAR: Lone Sails | Bandcamp | Spotify Joel Schoch’s score for the unusual vehicle-based trundle-simulator FAR: Lone Sails is a thing of rare beauty. As the player propels a hulking vessel over a shattered landscape, the music brings the experience to life, with plucked strings, stirring cello, and flurries of plucked notes combining into a soundtrack that’s simultaneously propulsive and contemplative. Lingering somewhere between experimental instrumental folk and contemporary composition, it’s a vibrant, atmospheric cycle of music that summons goosebumps, whether in the game or on the stereo. JR The Pathless | Bandcamp | Spotify Austin Wintory’s score for this 2020 indie game is a real one-off. Based around the idea of “the familar new”, Wintory sought to create a score both symphonic in scope and ear-catchingly unusual by bringing together rarely-heard instruments from outside the orchestral canon. This involved researching folk music traditions, and finding a diverse range of performers and players, from a Tuvan throat-singing ensemble Kailesh, to the nyckelharpa, viola da gamba, oud, and bass kazoo. The results are quite astonishing whether experienced in the game or listened to alone, and so much music was produced that a sister album, ‘The Pathless: Meditations’, was released alongside the game’s OST. You can also catch various documentaries of the soundtrack’s production at Wintory’s YouTube channel. JR JR = John Rogers | RAR Gaming Editor & Gaming In The Wild podcast host | Twitter JM = Jeremy Miller | Games critic & collector | Twitter RC = Ruth Coppens | Games critic & Game For Thought podcast host | Twitter

  • Tender Buttons #6: Petrol Girls Cut, Stitch, Make, Do

    by Ciarán Daly In this episode we talk to Ren Aldridge, artist, writer and singer in feminist post-hardcore band Petrol Girls about the intersection of her art and politics. We chat about the DIY punk practice of passing the mic, learning by doing, zine culture, the power and limitations of anger & more. If you would like to donate to the Solidarity not Silence campaign, to help raise funds for women facing a defamation claim from a man in the music industry for statements they made concerning his treatment of women, you can do so here or buy the Petrol Girls track, I Believe Them, here. Solidarity not Silence are also dropping a new single on 4th May via Alcopop Records - This Is Sisterhood. For updates on this follow the Solidarity not Silence Twitter here. Tender Buttons is a Bristol-based podcast chatting to writers and artists about their ideas, process and politics. Hosted by Jessica Andrews and Jack Young, the show is produced in partnership with Storysmith Bookshop in Bristol. Follow Tender Buttons on Twitter and Instagram.

  • Tender Buttons #7: Poetry as Magic, Witches and the Non-Human

    by Ciarán Daly In this episode, we chat to poet and essayist Rebecca Tamás about the figure of the witch, the power of language to manifest change in the world and poetry as a way to speak with not for voices that have been silenced throughout history. We talk about the role of awe and emotion in forging a deeper relationship with the non-human world, climate grief, the loss of language and the impact of late capitalism on our psyches, bodies and planet. You can buy Rebecca's books from Storysmith with a 10% discount, check out the episode to find out more. Tender Buttons is a Bristol-based podcast chatting to writers and artists about their ideas, process and politics. Hosted by Jessica Andrews and Jack Young, the show is produced in partnership with Storysmith Bookshop in Bristol. Follow Tender Buttons on Twitter and Instagram.

  • Gaming In The Wild #60: Immortals: Fenyx Rising

    by John Rogers This week I took on Ubisoft's Immortals: Fenyx Rising. It's a comedic take on some familiar Greek myths, with gameplay DNA from both the Assassin's Creed series and, notably, Nintendo's Breath of the Wild. Also mentioned this episode: Sludge Life, Umurangi Generation, Slay The Spire, Death Stranding, FAR: Changing Tides and the Wholesome Games direct. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #59: Slay The Spire

    by John Rogers This week’s featured game is indie smash-hit Slay the Spire. It’s an easy to play, tough to master deck-battler game in which you try to fight your way to the top of the mysterious spire via bouts of addictive, strategic combat. There’s also a less positive review of the conceptually interesting, visually spectacular and deeply flawed Hellblade: Senua’s Sacrifice. Also mentioned this episode: Ni No Kuni, Immortals: Fenyx Rising, Card of Darkness, Loop Hero, Sludge Life, Umurangi Generation. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Love is the Message #1: Dance, Music and Counterculture

    by Matt Huxley Love is the Message: Music, Dance & Counterculture is a new show from Tim Lawrence and Jeremy Gilbert, both of them authors, academics, DJs and audiophile dance party organisers. They’ve been friends and collaborators since 1997, teaching together and running parties since 2003. With clubs closed and half their jobs lost to university cuts, they’re inevitably launching a podcast. Tune in, Turn on and Get Down to in-depth discussion of the sonic, social and political legacies of radical movements past and present, from the 1960s to today. Starting with David Mancuso's NYC Loft parties, we’ll explore the countercultural sounds, scenes and ideas of the late 20th and early 21st centuries. In this introductory episode, Tim and Jeremy set out some of the major themes and moments the project will encounter, as well as introducing themselves as thinkers, dancers and friends. LISTEN BELOW: Produced and edited by Matt Huxley. Become a supporter by visiting our Patreon Tracklist: The Beatles - All You Need Is Love Exuma - Exuma, The Obeah Man MFSB - Love is the Message Blaze - Brand New Day Can - Future Days

  • Gaming In The Wild #58: Fantasian

    by John Rogers This week, our featured game is Apple Arcade's very own JRPG epic: Fantasian. Made by the producer of the original Final Fantasy series, it's a loving tribute to classic JRPGs past, with all of the charm and eccentricity that entails. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Tender Buttons #5: Thin Places

    by Ciarán Daly In this episode we chat to writer Kerri ní Dochartaigh about her new book Thin Places (Canongate) and its powerful weaving of memoir, history, Irish folklore, language and nature writing. We discuss her childhood growing up in Derry amidst the Troubles, the necessity of expanding our kinship with the non-human world and the ways in which a new generation of writers of landscape are blazing open the field. You can find Kerri's book at storysmithbooks.com/tenderbuttons Tender Buttons is a Bristol-based podcast chatting to writers and artists about their ideas, process and politics. Hosted by Jessica Andrews and Jack Young, the show is produced in partnership with Storysmith Bookshop in Bristol. Follow Tender Buttons on Twitter and Instagram.

  • Tender Buttons #4: The Poetry of The Mundane

    by Ciarán Daly In the first of our Bristol-based episodes, we speak to graphic novelist, musician, educator and all-round local legend Joff Winterhart about the poetry of the mundane, the hinterlands of suburbs and industrial estates, crises in contemporary masculinity and Joff's use of the graphic form. Joff's graphic novels are Days of the Bagnold Summer (2012) and Driving Short Distances (2017). You can find both of Joff's books at storysmithbooks.com/tenderbuttons As a Tender Buttons listener you can purchase Joff's books with 10% discount, have a listen for more details on this... Joff's band Bucky can be found here Tender Buttons is a Bristol-based podcast chatting to writers and artists about their ideas, process and politics. Hosted by Jessica Andrews and Jack Young, the show is produced in partnership with Storysmith Bookshop in Bristol. Follow Tender Buttons on Twitter and Instagram.

  • Gaming In The Wild #57: NUTS

    by John Rogers This week I delved into the mysteries of Melmouth Forest in Apple Arcade gem NUTS (also available on Steam and Switch). Just what are those squirrels up to? Well, I won’t tell you, because it’s a spoiler-free show – but I will tell you about the art, sound, gameworld and mechanics of this Iceland-made indie title. Also mentioned: Bioshock Infinite, King of Seas, Cozy Grove, and Fallout 4 (yep, I'm still playing it). Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Tender Buttons #3: Flesh, Meat and Fighting the Guerrilla Culture War

    by Ciarán Daly We chat to writer Huw Lemmey about queer desire, shame, a politics of bodily love and ways to fight the British culture war. You can subscribe to Huw’s weekly essays on his ‘Utopian Drivel’ substack here His two novels are Chubz: The Demonization of My Working Arse (Montrez Press: 2014) and Red Tory: My Corbyn Chemsex Hell (Montrez: 2019) His Bad Gays Podcast, with co-host Ben Miller Tender Buttons is a Bristol-based podcast chatting to writers and artists about their ideas, process and politics. Hosted by Jessica Andrews and Jack Young, the show is produced in partnership with Storysmith Bookshop in Bristol. Follow Tender Buttons on Twitter and Instagram.

  • Gaming In The Wild #56: Signs of the Sojourner

    by John Rogers This week's game is the fascinating conversation-based future road trip simulator Signs Of The Sojourner. I really loved this game, and I highly recommend trying it out! Also mentioned: Cozy Grove, Streets of Rage 4 and Bioshock Infinite. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Tender Buttons #2: Slippery Desires

    by Ciarán Daly For Tender Buttons' second episode, they spoke to writer Catherine Madden about form, sexuality, and childhood. Tender Buttons is a Bristol-based podcast chatting to writers and artists about their ideas, process and politics. Hosted by Jessica Andrews and Jack Young, the show is produced in partnership with Storysmith Bookshop in Bristol. Follow Tender Buttons on Twitter and Instagram.

  • Tender Buttons #1: It Begins With Our Bodies

    by Ciarán Daly For Tender Buttons' first episode, they spoke with co-host Jessica Andrews about her debut novel, 'Saltwater'. Tender Buttons is a Bristol-based podcast chatting to writers and artists about their ideas, process and politics. Hosted by Jessica Andrews and Jack Young, the show is produced in partnership with Storysmith Bookshop in Bristol. Follow Tender Buttons on Twitter and Instagram.

  • Gaming In The Wild #54: Narita Boy

    by John Rogers This week it's time to take up the Techno-Sword, become one with the Trichroma, and ride the Servo-Horse to victory in the Digital Kingdom of compelling high-retro pixel-art hack 'n' slasher Narita Boy. Also mentioned: The Longing & Bioshock Infinite. Also: many thanks to Stephan for being the show's newest Patreon Patron! If you'd to join him in supporting the show, I'm very grateful – in return, you get exclusive episodes, sale recommendations, and an invite to the show’s Discord community. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #51: Fez

    by John Rogers This episode looks at Fez, the classic 2012 indie platform game that made its way to Switch last week. It’s as wonderful today as it was upon release, and I talk through its high points (aesthetic, music, gameplay) and a few of the low ones (that map - my god!). Also mentioned: Ring Fit Adventure, Forgotten Fields, Red Dead Redemption 2 and Fire Emblem: Three Houses. Thanks to my latest Patron supporter Major Jennyral. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #53: Paradise Killer

    by John Rogers Paradise Killer is a truly odd detective game, mixing a Miami Vice 1980s aesthetic with brutalist architecture, Lovecraftian gods, demonic possession, murder, class commentary, and sexy synth pop. We stay spoiler-free on the details of The Crime To End All Crimes in this 20-minute review. Also mentioned: Narita Boy, The Longing, Art Squool, Immortals: Fenyx Rising; thanks go to Patreon patron Broken Pixel for recommending The Longing, and game streamer Kerlsburgers for being the show's newest patron! Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #50: Horizon Zero Dawn: The Frozen Wilds

    by John Rogers For episode number fifty, I revisited the featured game of episode one – the classic open-world saga Horizon Zero Dawn – to explore the impressive Frozen Wilds DLC. There's also a review of Aggro Crab's colourful rogue-like dungeon crawler Going Under, and we finish with some fun listener questions. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #49: Shinsekasi: Into The Depths

    by John Rogers This week I explored the bed of a far-future ocean in Shinsekai: Into The Depths. This exploration-focused Metroidvania feels like an indie game, but it was actually developed by Capcom Japan specifically for Apple Arcade. As of late 2020, it's also available on Nintendo Switch, where it definitely qualifies as a hidden gem for fans of underwater games, Metroidvanias, and sci-fi with a Japanese flavour. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Down And Out In The Art World #1: Being Working Class In The Cultural Field

    by Mike Watson This is a new podcast format presented by Mike Watson of the Acid Left and artist Bobby Dowler. It's about how to survive as a poor artist, curator or writer in the art world, drawing on the personal experiences and advice of its hosts and guests. Support the Acid Left on Patreon and Facebook Mike Watson is a Finland-based curator, critic, and author of Zer0 Books' 'Can The Left Learn To Meme?' Follow him on Twitter.

  • Gaming In The Wild #47: The Collage Atlas

    by John Rogers These week I leaf through the pages of The Collage Atlas – a wonderfully delicate, aesthetic hand-drawn game that came out in 2020 for Apple Arcade. Also: an earthquake update, more praise for Fallout 4, and some news about the great games that are lined up for future episodes. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #48: Life Is Strange

    by John Rogers This week's episode takes a look at 2015 episodic graphic adventure Life Is Strange. It's a nostalgic game that's littered with pop cultural references from Twin Peaks to The X-Files to Groundhog Day, with a wonderful soundtrack and a story that's part paranormal mystery and part intimate character study, with moments of lightness set against some heavy themes. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Locust Radio #6: Texas Ain't The Reason

    by Locust Radio We’ve got Locust contributors and Texan communists Mike Linaweaver and Leslie Lea as guests this episode to talk about the disaster in Texas after winter storm Uri knocked out the whole state’s power. We discuss the uneven (and deadly) consequences of the catastrophe, the venality of the state’s conservative rulers, the ineptitude of liberals’ supposed alternative, and the slow unfolding apocalypse that now faces the state and the country. We also pay a modest tribute to our dear departed inspiration Lawrence Ferlinghetti, hear some poetry from Mike and Leslie, and plant a little bug in Leslie’s ear about starting a communist resurrection cult! LISTEN: “Powerless in Texas,” by Snehal Shingavi, Rampant: https://rampantmag.com/2021/02/19/powerless-in-texas/ Fire Alarm: Reading Walter Benjamin’s On the Concept of History by Michael Lowy “Live Free and Die: Notes On American Exterminism,” by Alexander Billet, Historical Materialism blog: https://www.historicalmaterialism.org/blog/live-free-and-die-notes-american-exterminism “Cosmic Catwalk and the Production of Time,” by Anton Vidokle and Hito Steyerl, e-flux: https://www.e-flux.com/journal/82/134989/cosmic-catwalk-and-the-production-of-time/ Locust Radio is produced by Drew Franzblau. It is hosted by Alexander Billet, Tish Markley and Adam Turl. Music is by Omnia Sol.

  • Gaming In The Wild #46: Disco Elysium

    by John Rogers This week's episode is about one of the most cerebral, detailed gameworlds I've ever inhabited: it’s the award-winning Disco Elysium, by Estonian studio ZA/UM. It's a game that mixes a dense, layered, politically rich game world with a fear & loathing-style protagonist, an innovative "consciousness simulator", and an intriguing murder mystery. Also mentioned: Sea of Solitude and (yes, again) Fallout 4. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #45: A Plague Tale

    by John Rogers This week’s episode journeys into the dark heart of an accomplished narrative-led adventure game – A Plague Tale: Innocence. Also: an Iceland earthquake update, first impressions of promising puzzle game Maquette, and further impressions of NUTS and Fallout 4. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #44: Entwined, Fallout 4

    by John Rogers This week we take a step back in time to review 2014 title Entwined by PixelOpus, developers of Concrete Genie; and also a step into the future in the bleak but engaging wasteland of Fallout 4. Also mentioned: Solar Ash, A Plague Tale: Innocence, Nuts, Monument Valley, Maquette, and more. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Locust Radio #5: Norming In America

    by Locust Radio Lots has happened since our last episode: the storming of the Capitol, the fascists’ disorientation, and the inauguration of a new president who can’t wait for us to get “back to normal.” Tish, Adam, and Alex discuss what it is about capitalism’s obsessions with normalcy that is so detrimental to working and oppressed people. Also, an unexpected guest shows up in the form of a dead coyote wearing a Hawaiian shirt and sunglasses. For the second half of our show, available to SUBSCRIBERS ONLY, Alex reads a long excerpt from his massive essay in the newest issue of Salvage. Also, Tish, Adam and Alex talk about the aesthetics of the GameStop short squeeze, how capitalism presents us with the illusion of justice, and how we might see through the veneer. If you want to hear more than just the preview of this portion, you will have to subscribe. If you haven’t yet, do so here. LISTEN: Check out more of Omnia Sol’s work on YouTube, Instagram or Patreon Check out Adam Ray Adkins’ work at his YouTube or Instagram Locust Radio is produced by Drew Franzblau. It is hosted by Alexander Billet, Tish Markley and Adam Turl.

  • Gaming In The Wild #43: Concrete Genie

    by John Rogers This week I painted the walls of a bleak post-industrial town with neon nature dreamscapes in the fantastic modern fairytale Concrete Genie. It's an original and innovative game by Pixelopus, a studio with an interesting origin story in its own right. Also mentioned: Furi, Mario Galaxy, a preview of 2021 games, and some very exciting news about a forthcoming composer interview. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #42: Paper Beast, Cultist Simulator

    by John Rogers This week's episode features two fascinating games. First it's a recommendation for the experiential origami nature odyssey Paper Beast – released in 2020 for Oculus and PSVR – followed by a critique of the bafflingly designed Cultist Simulator, which was recently ported to Switch. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #41: Interview - 'In Other Waters'

    by John Rogers This week's episode is an interview with Gareth Damian Martin, an artist, writer, and the developer of 'In Other Waters'. It's an unusual game that offers you the chance to explore an alien ocean, experience an imaginative, detailed and plausible-seeming marine ecosystem, and to uncover a sci-fi mystery. It was an illuminating conversation that covers the game's conception, the ensuing research, writing and design, and the process of launching a game as a first-time developer. Follow Gareth on Twitter at @jumpovertheage and @InOtherWaters. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #40: Alba - A Wildlife Adventure

    by John Rogers How time flies… it’s episode 40! That means the podcast is old enough to wonder why it doesn’t yet own a house and start worrying about doing more cardio. Lucky, then, that this week’s game is Alba: A Wildlife Adventure, which is a wonderfully innocent game about childhood, nature, birds, and the unbridled fun of summer holidays. Also mentioned: the Backbone iPhone controller, PSVR, Apple Arcade, South of the Circle, Necrobarista, Nuts, What The Golf?, Immortals Fenyx Rising, Art of Rally, In Other Waters, Disco Elysium, and more. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild: Games Of The Year #3

    by John Rogers Still: Umurangi Generation (2020; Origame Digital) In the final of three GOTY 2020 episodes, this week’s guest is gamer, streamer, and brand new dog owner Dani aka Girl With Box. Dani brings a fresh multiplayer selection that helped her stay sane in the year that was. You can follow Dani at twitter.com/girlwithbox. (Note, Dog With Box, aka Muncy, does a bit of background gnawing at the start - if it bothers you, jump in at minute 17 and you’re safe from there. The game under discussion is Just Dance.) Music by Ben Babbitt, from Kentucky Route Zero Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Acid Left Review Radionautica: Synchronicity and the Situationist Dérive

    by Mike Watson Adam Ray Adkins of the Acid Left tries out Randonautica, the app that gives its users a set of quantum random coordinates for them to explore at their leisure (or risk, if some accounts on YouTube are to be believed). The app admixes genuine quantum random number processing with the concept of Jungian Synchronicity. Here we discuss Acid Left co-host Adam's use of the app in relation to Synchronicity and the Guy Debord's Dérive. The Dérive is the idea of free-flowing walks that take you outside your daily routine, while synchronicity explains the existence of 'meaningful coincidences'. Users of Randonautica have stumbled upon spooky, criminal and simply scarily coincidental finds, warning some people to avoid the app. Adam investigates for himself. Music by 'Made in 1985': https://madein1985.bandcamp.com/music with permission Co-Produced: Adam Ray Adkins & Mike Watson Visuals/Editing: Mike Watson Follow the Adorno Studies Podcast Support the Acid Left on Patreon and Facebook Mike Watson is a Finland-based curator, critic, and author of Zer0 Books' 'Can The Left Learn To Meme?' Follow him on Twitter.

  • Locust Radio #4: Make Acid Communist Again

    by Locust Radio We have guests! Artists Omnia Sol (whose music you will recognize as a regular feature at Locust Radio) and Adam Ray Adkins (a.k.a. Dirt: Son of Earth and co-host of the Acid Left videocast) come on the show to talk their own work, the impact of acid communism, and what it means to build a 21st century psychedelic reason. Each of our guests shares some of their poetry and music, and we hear some more of Tish’s ongoing novel Sounds. Plus, just in time for the holidays, we get to hear what actually happened to George Bailey that night in Pottersville, after the Angel of History intervened... For the second half of our show, available to SUBSCRIBERS ONLY, Tish and Adkins share a bit more of their work. We also talk a bit more about narrative conceptualism, and why the Peoria Cookie Monster mural is so much more interesting than those stupid fucking monoliths that have been appearing lately. If you want to hear this portion, and haven’t subscribed yet, do so now: https://www.patreon.com/locustreview LISTEN: Check out more of Omnia Sol’s work on YouTube, Instagram or Patreon Check out Adam Ray Adkins’ work at his YouTube or Instagram Locust Radio is produced by Drew Franzblau. It is hosted by Alexander Billet, Tish Markley and Adam Turl.

  • Gaming In The Wild: Games Of The Year #2

    by John Rogers Still: Umurangi Generation (2020; Origame Digital) My second Games of the Year guest is Louis, co-host of the excellent Time Played 3hr podcast, who dropped by to talk about the history of rally driving, in-game photography, turning horses into glue, Cyberpunk 2077, and much more besides. It was a really fun chat, be sure to check out Time Played 3hr, streaming now on all reputable podcast services. Games discussed: 12:01 Umurangi Generation 18:35 The Pathless 30:40 Wide Ocean Big Jacket 36:00 In Other Waters 43:40 Animal Farm 56:00 A Short Hike 64:44 Art of Rally 72:36 The Last Of Us Pt. II 93:03 Cyberpunk 2077 106:07 Kentucky Route Zero 118:50 Wandersong 119:41 Manifold Garden You can find the article Louis mentioned about Last Of Us Pt. II here and you can find the great video games e-zine I referenced called Heterotopias here and the Adam Robinson-Yu Short Hike lecture here Music by Ben Babbitt, from Kentucky Route Zero Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild: Games Of The Year #1 (feat. Our Co-Editor Ciarán!)

    by John Rogers Still: The Last Of Us Part II (2020; Naughty Dog / SIE) On this week’s episode I welcome special guest Ciarán Daly to the show. He's one of the people behind the Radical Art Review (and kind of my “gaming mentor”). We each talked about five games we loved playing this year. It’s not all about 2020 releases - some of them are from last year, or earlier - but it was a really fun chat about games as diverse as Mario All-Stars, Dreams, Disco Elysium, Kentucky Route Zero, Hollow Knight, Death Stranding, The Last of Us Pt. II, Outer Wilds, and more. The next few shows will feature other guests talking through their year in games. Music by Ben Babbitt, from Kentucky Route Zero Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Gaming In The Wild #34: Control DLC, No Man's Sky, Alto's Adventure, Gato Roboto, Ni No Kuni

    by John Rogers Still: Control (2019; Remedy Entertainment) This week’s episode is a roundup of some true show favourites that have recently had updates. Remedy’s Control has added much-needed difficulty options and two new episodes; No Man’s Sky has continued to grow and improve with the 2020 Desolation and Origins updates. I also share some thoughts on recent sale buys Gato Roboto, The Alto Collection, and Ni No Kuni: Wrath of the White Witch. You can come say hi and follow the show on Twitter, Instagram, YouTube and Twitch via http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild. I'm also very grateful to my listeners who support the show via Patreon, and in return get exclusive episodes, weekly sale recommendations, and an invite to the show’s Discord community. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Invisible Bodies: Can Mourning Be Intersectional?

    The video’s audio is taken from an interview with a fellow protestor Violetta (renamed for anonymity arguably be reproducing the same systemic violence, it remains an important short-term tool to create an accessible

  • Gaming In The Wild #33: Pyre

    by John Rogers Concept art: Pyre (2017; Supergiant Games) This week's game is the third polished gem in the Supergiant Games roster. After escaping from Hades last episode, this time I traverse the Downside in the high-fantasy visual novel–RPG–sports game Pyre. It's an inventive and aesthetically stunning one-off game that's like nothing else I've played. (There's a spoiler break half way through, so you can hear about it safely if you wanna play it yourself, or hear some late-game thoughts if you've played it already.) Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • How Conservation Groups Became Colonial

    Nangiria, said: “The government intends to divide up Ngorongoro and create a no-go zone, depriving Maasai access violence and abuse that Maasai communities are experiencing, as NCA authorities continue restricting access

  • SHiiku: Transforming Abandoned Spaces With Street Art

    Encouraged by the open, accessible space as well as social distancing measures and hand sanitizer, members The space itself was much more exposed, lending itself to accessibility - whereas previously many attendees

  • Adorno and Horkheimer's Culture Industry in 2020: Chat with Vladan Jeremic and Rena Raedle

    by Mike Watson *This video contains strobe effects and rapidly flashing lights. Warning to those who are sensitive.* Continuing the Beyond Linguistics Reading Group, Adam Ray Adkins and Mike Watson host artist duo Vladan Jeremic and Rena Raedle to discuss "The Culture Industry: Enlightenment as Mass Deception", chapter four of the Dialectic of Enlightenment by Adorno and Horkheimer. Rena Rädle & Vladan Jeremić are Belgrade-based artists whose research-oriented work comprises drawing and text, video, photography, installation and intervention in public space. Since 2002, in their collaborative practice Rena & Vladan explore the relation between art and politics, unveiling the contradictions of today's societies and developing transformative potentials of art in the context of social struggles. They use techniques that are easy to reproduce and distribute such as drawing and prints and simple materials such as textile, cardboard and wood, insisting on the use value and social and ecological awareness of their artistic production. They engage with current debates and struggles in collaboration with social movements and disseminate their art works through reproduction in various media. Co-Written/Co-Produced: Adam Ray Adkins & Mike Watson Visuals/Editing: Mike Watson Narrated: Adam Ray Adkins Mike wrote Can the Left Learn to Meme?: Adorno, Video Gaming and Stranger Things Follow the Adorno Studies Podcast Support the Acid Left on Patreon and Facebook Mike Watson is a Finland-based curator, critic, and author of Zer0 Books' 'Can The Left Learn To Meme?' Follow him on Twitter.

  • Locust Radio #3: Four Seasons Totalitarian Landscaping

    by Locust Radio Adam, Tish, and Alex discuss all manner of post-election oddities, and what they tell us about an imminent Joe Biden presidency. We also talk about the prospects for anti-fascism, the tasks of radical art, and why brunch is a stupid idea for a meal in the first place. Plus, poetry from Tish and fellow Locust editor Mike Linaweaver, and the final thoughts of two very presidential severed heads. For the second half of our show, available to SUBSCRIBERS ONLY, we share some of our current writing and research, including a much-overlooked group of writers who tried to claim sci-fi for communism in the 1930s, and an overview of the work of Hugo-nominated fantasy writer Chuck Tingle. If you want to hear this portion, and haven’t subscribed yet, do so now: https://www.patreon.com/locustreview LISTEN: “The Urgency of Anti-Fascism,” by Adam Turl, Tempest, October 15th, 2020: Starship Troopers, written by Eric Neumeier, directed by Paul Verhoeven “The Politics of the Pandemic: Panel I,” part of Historical Materialism Online, featuring Rob Wallace, Richard Seymour, Josep Maria Antentas, George Nikolaidis: “Out of the Castle and Into the Street: Art Under Trump,” editorial in Red Wedge, January 20th, 2017: "One thinge that ouerthroweth all that were graunted before’: On Being Presidential,” by China Mieville, Salvage, January 30th, 2018 Locust Radio is produced by Drew Franzblau. It is hosted by Alexander Billet, Tish Markley and Adam Turl.

  • Gaming In The Wild #32: Hades

    by John Rogers Still: 'Hades' (2020; Supergiant Games) This week’s show is about Hades, an all-action roguelike dungeon crawler set in the Greek underworld. It’s not my usual genre, but it's by the acclaimed Supergiant studio who made Transistor, Pyre and Bastion, which bodes well for any game. It took a bit of a journey to understand the mechanics, but it's a supremely entertaining game that earned my admiration by the end. It’s out now for Nintendo Switch, Windows and Mac. Support the show on Patreon to get exclusive episodes and articles Thanks for listening! Follow the show on Twitch, Twitter, Instagram and elsewhere: http://linktr.ee/gaminginthewild.

  • Did Mark Fisher Hate Weed? Acid Communism and the Stoned Millennial Revolutionary

    by Mike Watson *This video contains strobe effects and rapidly flashing lights. Warning to those who are sensitive.* This video examines an oft-quoted passage from Mark Fisher’s 'Capitalist Realism' that has become the focus of left meme makers in recent months due to its seemingly anti-drug, anti-student message. Here we ask whether Fisher really intended to chastise the youth. Could his critique be aimed at something deeper, such as systemic capitalism and the effect it has on young minds? And what would he make of today’s left wing meme lords and youtubers? Adam Ray Adkins reads a script that he and Mike Watson co wrote in an effort to find out. Co-Written/Co-Produced: Adam Ray Adkins & Mike Watson Visuals/Editing: Mike Watson Narrated: Adam Ray Adkins Music by 'Made in 1985': https://madein1985.bandcamp.com/music Mike wrote Can the Left Learn to Meme?: Adorno, Video Gaming and Stranger Things Follow the Adorno Studies Podcast Support the Acid Left on Patreon and Facebook Mike Watson is a Finland-based curator, critic, and author of Zer0 Books' 'Can The Left Learn To Meme?' Follow him on Twitter.